MT CVD and Diabetes Prevention Program logo

Montana Cardiovascular Disease and Diabetes Prevention Program

Diverse Montana Communities Deliver Lifestyle Change Program to Prevent Diabetes

Since 2008, Montana communities have been helping prevent type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease among adults at high risk through the Montana Cardiovascular Disease and Diabetes Prevention Program (CVDDPP).  The 10-month CVDDPP is based upon research evidence that intensive lifestyle change can prevent or delay the development of diabetes by 58% among adults at high risk.1

Lifestyle coaches educate and motivate participants to develop and maintain healthier eating and physical activity habits, which lead to weight loss and control.  These lifestyle coaches are registered dietitians, registered nurses, cardiac rehabilitation nurses, and exercise specialists trained to deliver the CVDDPP.

Eligibility criteria for the CVDDPP are based upon risk factors for type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease.  Adults aged 18 years and over with a Body Mass Index (BMI) ≥25 kg/m2, medical clearance from a doctor, a commitment to lifestyle change, and one of the following may participate:

  • History of pre-diabetes, impaired glucose tolerance, or impaired fasting glucose
  • History of gestational diabetes or birth to a baby weighing >9 lbs
  • High blood pressure (≥130/85 mmHg or treatment)
  • Dyslipidemia (triglycerides >150 mg/dL, LDL cholesterol >130 mg/dL or treatment, or HDL cholesterol <40 mg/dL for men and <50 mg/dL for women)
  • A1C between 5.7% to 6.4%

 

In Montana, an estimated 185,000 adults over age 20 have pre-diabetes.3 The rate of diabetes reported by adult Montanans increased from 2.8% in 1990 to 7.0% in 2010.4  Based on these rates, it is estimated that nearly 70,000 adult Montanans have diagnosed diabetes.5  Over 8% of deaths in Montana are diabetes-related.6

 

Participating in the program is an effective way to slow these trends.  Over 2,000 Montanans have participated in the prevention program since it began in 2008.  Here are the average 10 month program results:

  • Weight loss of 15.4 lbs
  • Blood pressure reduction from 133/81 mmHg to 127/78 mmHg
  • LDL cholesterol reduction from 123 mg/dL to 119 mg/DL
  • HDL cholesterol increase from 49 mg/dL to 51 mg/dL
  • Fasting blood glucose reduction from 102 mg/dL to 97 mg/dL

 

Fourteen sites and four telehealth sites currently deliver the CVDDPP in communities designated8 as

  • Urban: Billings
  • Rural: Missoula, Kalispell, Great Falls, Helena, Butte, Bozeman
  • Frontier: Libby, Choteau, Dillon, Baker, Colstrip, Ekalaka, Forsyth,  Miles City

 

Go to www.mtprevention.org to contact the site near you, read news and journal articles, and learn more.  For more information, contact Diane Arave, the Montana Diabetes Project Quality Improvement Specialist in Prevention, at darave2@mt.gov or (406) 444-0593.

 

References and Data Sources

1. Knowler WC, Barrett-Connor E, Fowler SE, Hamman RF, Lachin JM, Walker EA, Nathan DM; Diabetes Prevention Program Research Group: Reduction in the incidence of type 2 diabetes with lifestyle intervention or metformin. N Engl J Med 2002;346:393–402.

2. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. National diabetes fact sheet: national estimates and general information on diabetes and prediabetes in the United States, 2011. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2011.

3. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. National Diabetes Statistics, 2007 fact sheet. Bethesda, MD: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, National Institutes of Health, 2008.

4. Montana DPHHS, Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System.

5. U.S. Census Bureau: State and County QuickFacts.

6. Montana DPHHS, Office of Vital Statistics.

7. Vanderwood KK, Hall TO, Harwell TS, Butcher MK, Helgerson SD. The Montana Cardiovascular Disease and Diabetes Prevention Workgroup. Implementing a state-based cardiovascular disease and diabetes prevention program. Diab Care 2010;33:2543–2545.

Park St CG BROCHURE

Park Street Community Garden

A community garden in Uptown Butte that aims to revitalize the historic uptown, unite
neighbors, educate the community about eating locally, and provide residents
with an opportunity to grow their own produce.

 

There is no single formula for a successful community garden, but whether it is a small urban affair or a larger rural endeavor that can accommodate several hundred gardeners, the community reaps many benefits from it. From a practical perspective, this community garden allows local citizens to lease a plot for a season to grow food for their own use or to give to others. It provides an educational experience for those wanting to learn about growing organic produce in a high mountain climate. It provides fresh produce at a reduced cost. It is a place for local school children to gather and learn about the science of soils, plants, nature, and participation in their community. This garden allows like-minded folks of all generations to enjoy the process of planting, growing, and harvesting the fruits of the earth and producing something they can be proud of. A plot designated for growing fresh food for a local charity is waiting for volunteers who wish to give of their time and energy in that manner.

The Park Street Community Garden Project is a collaborative effort with Sacred Ground, a not-profit, volunteer organization dedicated to promoting wellness, sustainability and community building.

You may find a variety of activities open to the community including yoga, international dance, belly dance, Dharma group, drumming, as well as host for discussion groups.   The builders of this garden began organizing in the fall of 2009 and opened their garden plots to members in June of 2011.  The garden property is leased from the city, and they have assisted with many tasks, such as delivering soil for raised beds and installing a water service line at the site.

 

 Visit their website: http://www.sacredgroundbutte.org/parkst_garden.htm

For more information, please contact:
Julie Butler or Carol Link

 Garden Organizers of the Park Street Community Garden

 jahern4@yahoo.com or  healthlinkpt@gmail.com