Profile of the Week: Journeys from Home Montana – “Better Health through Walking and Bicycling”

“Better Health Through Walking and Bicycling” is organized by Journeys from Home Montana. This particular collection of in-school and out-of-school programs conducts workshops for community members, teachers and bicycle advocates directed at making the community more friendly to walking and bicycling.

Journeys From Home Montana (JFHM) promotes living an active healthy lifestyle.  We encourage communities to become pedestrian and bicycle friendly by offering tools, techniques and mentoring to meet that objective. The core of our work is done on the ground with teachers, parents, advocates and children; face to face in small communities conducting seminars, workshops and on-line classes.

 JFHM communicates through their website and their Facebook page

 Purpose

  • To give children the skills necessary to become competent, predictable, and comfortable on their route to school.
  •  To give parents the confidence to allow children to travel freely in their community.

The Task

Provide children and youth with the experiences necessary to acquire the tools and knowledge that will allow them to travel safely and predictably under their own power in their own community.

The Vision 

We envision all children living and learning in a loving, least restrictive environment.  We recognize children as intelligent individuals.  We see children empowered by the opportunity to make choices and gain knowledge through guided discovery.  Our hope is that all children have opportunity for a happy and healthful childhood that will lead to a meaningful and productive adulthood.

The Mission 

We, as responsible caring adults, will study all available information regarding the development and education of children.  We will work diligently to provide the opportunities and experiences that allow youth to mature independently.

The People

We are a multi-generational group of educators, designers and filmmakers that are pro-active and solution based. Our passion and specialty is the prevention of traffic related childhood injury. Since the 1970’s we have been developing and implementing countermeasure procedures to educate children, parents, teachers, law enforcement personnel and total communities. We are in the beta testing stages of the next generation of materials. These new materials are brought forward by the children (now adults with kids) that were involved and trained with the original program. This next generation of developers offers tools and experiences never before imagined in an injury prevention program. They have survived their Journeys from Home and share a committed appreciation for quality education. It is their experiences and observations that make this new generation of materials come to life.

Deliverables

At the completion of this initial effort “Journeys From Home Montana” will hold and maintain a web site that contains immediate access to international research and recommendations to maintain a sustainable non-motorized community transportation plan.

Many teaching materials will be free, downloadable and ready for immediate use; activities ranging from preschool, elementary, middle school, young adults and veteran riders through CyclingSavvy.

An on-line Teacher Training/Mentor component will be available and continually updated.

This website will become a home for parents, children, administrators, instructors, teachers and researchers to share insight and concerns.

 

Journeys From Home Montana staff and volunteers have presented information at local regional and national events, listed here: Community workshops

For more information about Journeys From Home Montana or any of their workshops, please contact:

Roger DiBrito, Executive Director
406.273.6458
jfh.montana@gmail.com

 

Profile of the Week: Strong Women

Strong Women

The primary objective of the StrongWomen™ Program is to help communities nationwide to implement safe and  effective strength training programs for midlife and older women.

Women begin to show decline in muscle mass beginning at age 30 and if this condition is not reversed, women will have reduced strength and other severe consequences as they age. Women need to maintain a healthy level of muscle mass at all ages for optimal health through weight lifting two or more times per week,  but only 17.5% of women meet these recommendations. The Strong Women program, developed by Tufts University, is designed for women to increase muscle strength by strength training for 2-3 sessions per week for fourteen weeks. This strength training program is now being offered through MSU Extension offices in Montana, and the results have been inspiring.  Participation, improved functional strength and balance, and a strong sense of camaraderie and achievement are positive outcomes for Montana’s rural women. These trainings are conducted by Extension educators who have been certified to teach Strong Women programs.

About Strong Women:
The StrongWomen™  program is an evidence-based strength training program developed by the staff of  the Hancock Center at the Friedman School at Tufts University. The primary objective of the StrongWomen™ Program is to help communities nationwide to implement safe and  effective strength training programs for midlife and older women.

Who should attend trainings:
* Professional and community leaders who are working with a non-profit and are interested in the fields of public health, nutrition and exercise or wellness should attend.

* Potential program leaders should be regularly lifting weights/strength training, be in good physical health, and be able to collaborate with local agencies or organizations to provide the Strong Women program in their community.

 

For a list of all locations and contact information, click here

MWHPC logo

Montana’s Worksite Health Promotion Coalition

   The Montana Worksite Health Promotion Coalition is a resource for Montana employers regarding the art and science of health promotion and wellness at work.

http://montanaworksitewellness.org/ 

Worksite health promotion has been proven to have a substantial impact on health care costs, absenteeism, workers compensation costs, and productivity. The website is designed to provide resources, encouragement, and a standard of excellence for those interested in working with us to promote healthy worksites in Montana.

This program conducts continuing statewide assessments of the state of employers engaging in worksite wellness. The coalition works as a resource for employers who offer worksite wellness programs. The coalition is designed to identify the employers taking progressive action to increase their employee’s satisfaction and productivity. To recognize these employers, the coalition offers an awards model, Excellence in Worksite Health Promotion Awards.

The Excellence in Worksite Health Promotion Awards mission is to “encourage, recognize, educate and create a standard of excellence for worksite health promotion programs.” The award qualifications are set high to serve as health goals for any organization to strive for. The Excellence in Worksite Health Promotion Awards has quality standards that are important components of worksite wellness programs. The standards include; management commitment, leadership, mission, assessment tool, target audience, tracking systems, interventions, measurement of outcomes, communication of results, and marketing. The criteria for the awards are evidence-based practices. The award qualifications may be modified as worksite wellness research develops. The awards are not intended to represent any level of certification. The qualifications for the awards are not necessarily the best or only ways for employers to deliver worksite wellness programs.

The coalition offers three different recognition awards: bronze, silver, and gold. These three awards differentiate between different levels of worksite wellness achievement. Worksite wellness programs awarded the bronze award focus on minimal or introductory services, voluntary participation, no targeted interventions or documented return on investment, and information dissemination with some activities. Programs that receive the silver award; have 30% voluntary participation, education focused on skill building, medical self-care, one-on-one consultations, and some targeted high-risk interventions. The gold award is received when; many corporate policies support wellness, there is incentivized participation (70%), the programs focus on targeted interventions, telephonic health coaching for high risk, there is a documented return of investment, and there is Population Health Management.

AFHK Montana

Montana Action for Healthy Kids

Montana AFHK is dedicated to improving the health and wellness of Montana’s children in schools and communities through nutrition and physical activity where children learn, participate in, and enjoy healthy lifestyle behaviors.

Montana Action for Healthy Kids (AFHK), a subcommittee of the national Action for Healthy Kids initiative, is a statewide coalition dedicated to improving the health and wellness of Montana’s children in schools and communities through nutrition and physical activity where children learn, participate in, and enjoy healthy lifestyle behaviors.  The goal of Montana AFHK is to provide simple, positive, consistent messages about nutrition and physical activity, while increasing physical activity opportunities for school aged children.  Creating parent-led projects at school and community levels and involving parents in creating healthier school and community environments for kids has led to increased support for healthy kids.  To share ideas and healthy lifestyle tips to parent and partner organization, Montana AFHK leads parent-focused presentations, develops and distributes educational materials, provides health training to teachers, and awards mini-grant programs to support nutrition and physical activity programs.  Montana AFHK also provides support to partner’s activities such as Big Sky Fit Kids.  In addition, Montana AFHK provides support to three local teams that have been created in Billings, Great Falls, and Helena to advocate for change at the local level.

For more information, please visit http://www.eatrightmontana.org/eatrightafhk.htm

or the national AFHK website at http://www.actionforhealthykids.org/

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Kids LiveWell

Kids LiveWell menu choices are available at more than 15,000 participating restaurant locations nationwide. Read our FAQs to learn more about the Kids LiveWell program.

1) What is the National Restaurant Association Kids LiveWell program?

The National Restaurant Association launched the Kids LiveWell program in collaboration with Healthy Dining to help parents and children select healthful menu options when dining out. Restaurants that participate in the voluntary program commit to offering healthful meal items for children, with a particular focus on increasing consumption of fruit and vegetables, lean protein, whole grains and low-fat dairy, and limiting unhealthy fats, sugars and sodium.

The Kids LiveWell program benefits both restaurateurs and guests. Participating restaurants get third-party verification and promotional materials for qualified meals and individual menu items. Parents and caretakers get accurate information to help them make informed decisions about their child’s meal.

2) How many restaurants are participating in the Kids LiveWell program?

More than 15,000 restaurant locations were part of the July 2011 launch of Kids LiveWell. These restaurants offer their young guests a selection of Kids LiveWell choices. We look forward to announcing additional restaurants and menu options in the coming months.

Inaugural Kids LiveWell leaders include 19 brands: Au Bon Pain, Bonefish Grill, Burger King, Burgerville, Carrabba’s Italian Grill, Chevys Fresh Mex, Chili’s Grill & Bar, Corner Bakery Cafe, Cracker Barrel, Denny’s, El Pollo Loco, Friendly’s, IHOP, Joe’s Crab Shack, Outback Steakhouse, Silver Diner, Sizzler, T-Bones Great American Eatery and zpizza.

3) How can a restaurant join the Kids LiveWell program?

Restaurants that join Kids LiveWell agree to offer and promote a selection of items that meet qualifying nutrition criteria based on leading health organizations’ scientific recommendations, including the 2010 USDA Dietary Guidelines. Healthy Dining’s team of registered dietitians has worked with participating restaurants to identify and validate the menu choices that meet the Kids LiveWell criteria. Restaurants participating in the Kids LiveWell program:

  • Offer at least one full children’s meal (an entrée, side and beverage) that is 600 calories or less; contains two or more servings of fruit, vegetables, whole grains, lean protein and/or low-fat dairy; and limits sodium, fats and sugar (see next question for details on nutrition criteria);
  • Offer at least one other individual item that has 200 calories or less, with limits on fats, sugars and sodium, and contains a serving of fruit, vegetables, whole grains, lean protein or low-fat dairy (see next question for details on nutrition criteria);
  • Display or make available upon request the nutrition profile of the healthful menu options; and
  • Promote/identify the healthful menu options.

For more information on joining the Kids’ LiveWell program, please contact Joy Dubost at the National Restaurant Association at (202) 973-5361 or jdubost@restaurant.org, or Erica Bohm at Healthy Dining at (858) 541-2049 or Erica@HealthyDiningFinder.com.

4) What nutrition criteria is a restaurant required to meet to participate in the Kids LiveWell program?

A restaurant’s featured Kids Livewell menu items must meet specific nutrition criteria recommended by leading health organizations’ scientific guidelines and verified by Healthy Dining’s team of registered dietitians. Criteria are listed here and also available on HealthyDiningFinder’s website.

Kids LiveWell Nutrition Criteria for Full Kids’ Meals (entrée, side option and beverage):

  • 600 calories or less
  • ≤ 35% of calories from total fat
  • ≤ 10% of calories from saturated fat
  • < 0.5 grams trans fat (artificial trans fat only)
  • ≤ 35% of calories from total sugars (added and naturally occurring)
  • ≤ 770 mg of sodium
  • 2 or more food groups (see below)

Kids LiveWell Nutrition Criteria for Side Items:

  • 200 calories or less
  • ≤ 35% of calories from total fat
  • ≤ 10% of calories from saturated fat
  • < 0.5 grams trans fat (artificial trans fat only)
  • ≤ 35% of calories from total sugars (added and naturally occurring)
  • ≤ 250 mg of sodium
  • 1 food group (see below)

Entrees must include two sources & sides must include one source of the following:

  • Fruit: > ½ cup = 1 star (includes 100% juice)
  • Vegetable: > ½ cup = 1 star
  • Whole grains:  contains whole grains = 1 star
  • Lean protein (skinless white meat poultry, fish/seafood, beef, pork, tofu, beans, egg whites/substitute):  > 2 ounces meat, 1 egg equivalent, 1 oz nuts/seeds/dry bean/peas = 1 star (lean as defined by USDA)
  • Lower-fat dairy (1% or skim milk and dairy):  > ½ cup = 1 star (while not considered low-fat, 2% milk is allowed if included in the meal and the meal still fits the full meal criteria)

5) What benefits do restaurants receive if they participate in Kids LiveWell?

For restaurants who want to provide healthful options for kids, Kids LiveWell can help showcase your commitment by providing a flexible and turn-key program for verifying and promoting your qualified menu items. Capitalize on the trend toward healthier dining and drive additional sales and traffic.

Participating restaurants receive:

For more information on joining the Kids’ LiveWell program, please contact Joy Dubost at the National Restaurant Association at (202) 973-5361 or jdubost@restaurant.org, or Erica Bohm at Healthy Dining at (858) 541-2049 or Erica@HealthyDiningFinder.com.

MT CVD and Diabetes Prevention Program logo

Montana Cardiovascular Disease and Diabetes Prevention Program

Diverse Montana Communities Deliver Lifestyle Change Program to Prevent Diabetes

Since 2008, Montana communities have been helping prevent type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease among adults at high risk through the Montana Cardiovascular Disease and Diabetes Prevention Program (CVDDPP).  The 10-month CVDDPP is based upon research evidence that intensive lifestyle change can prevent or delay the development of diabetes by 58% among adults at high risk.1

Lifestyle coaches educate and motivate participants to develop and maintain healthier eating and physical activity habits, which lead to weight loss and control.  These lifestyle coaches are registered dietitians, registered nurses, cardiac rehabilitation nurses, and exercise specialists trained to deliver the CVDDPP.

Eligibility criteria for the CVDDPP are based upon risk factors for type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease.  Adults aged 18 years and over with a Body Mass Index (BMI) ≥25 kg/m2, medical clearance from a doctor, a commitment to lifestyle change, and one of the following may participate:

  • History of pre-diabetes, impaired glucose tolerance, or impaired fasting glucose
  • History of gestational diabetes or birth to a baby weighing >9 lbs
  • High blood pressure (≥130/85 mmHg or treatment)
  • Dyslipidemia (triglycerides >150 mg/dL, LDL cholesterol >130 mg/dL or treatment, or HDL cholesterol <40 mg/dL for men and <50 mg/dL for women)
  • A1C between 5.7% to 6.4%

 

In Montana, an estimated 185,000 adults over age 20 have pre-diabetes.3 The rate of diabetes reported by adult Montanans increased from 2.8% in 1990 to 7.0% in 2010.4  Based on these rates, it is estimated that nearly 70,000 adult Montanans have diagnosed diabetes.5  Over 8% of deaths in Montana are diabetes-related.6

 

Participating in the program is an effective way to slow these trends.  Over 2,000 Montanans have participated in the prevention program since it began in 2008.  Here are the average 10 month program results:

  • Weight loss of 15.4 lbs
  • Blood pressure reduction from 133/81 mmHg to 127/78 mmHg
  • LDL cholesterol reduction from 123 mg/dL to 119 mg/DL
  • HDL cholesterol increase from 49 mg/dL to 51 mg/dL
  • Fasting blood glucose reduction from 102 mg/dL to 97 mg/dL

 

Fourteen sites and four telehealth sites currently deliver the CVDDPP in communities designated8 as

  • Urban: Billings
  • Rural: Missoula, Kalispell, Great Falls, Helena, Butte, Bozeman
  • Frontier: Libby, Choteau, Dillon, Baker, Colstrip, Ekalaka, Forsyth,  Miles City

 

Go to www.mtprevention.org to contact the site near you, read news and journal articles, and learn more.  For more information, contact Diane Arave, the Montana Diabetes Project Quality Improvement Specialist in Prevention, at darave2@mt.gov or (406) 444-0593.

 

References and Data Sources

1. Knowler WC, Barrett-Connor E, Fowler SE, Hamman RF, Lachin JM, Walker EA, Nathan DM; Diabetes Prevention Program Research Group: Reduction in the incidence of type 2 diabetes with lifestyle intervention or metformin. N Engl J Med 2002;346:393–402.

2. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. National diabetes fact sheet: national estimates and general information on diabetes and prediabetes in the United States, 2011. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2011.

3. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. National Diabetes Statistics, 2007 fact sheet. Bethesda, MD: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, National Institutes of Health, 2008.

4. Montana DPHHS, Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System.

5. U.S. Census Bureau: State and County QuickFacts.

6. Montana DPHHS, Office of Vital Statistics.

7. Vanderwood KK, Hall TO, Harwell TS, Butcher MK, Helgerson SD. The Montana Cardiovascular Disease and Diabetes Prevention Workgroup. Implementing a state-based cardiovascular disease and diabetes prevention program. Diab Care 2010;33:2543–2545.

STNYLogo

Steps to a New You

Community-based healthy lifestyle program that is highly effective in improving activity, food and nutrition, and body image.

In response to state statistics that many Montanans aren’t eating well, don’t enjoy physical activity, or have poor body image, educators in Wyoming, Idaho, and Montana collaborated to offer the Steps to A New You program to over 915 participants as part of an applied research project from 2004-2007.  The program was developed by Wellness in the Rockies, a three-state university consortium funded by the USDA. The seven sessions Steps to A New You program uses hands-on experiences, pedometers and record-keeping tools to help participants develop new attitudes and behaviors related to food, physical activity, and body image.

The program doesn’t prescribe a certain amount of exercise or a particular diet.  Rather, it uses discussion, self-monitoring through pedometer use, and real-life demonstrations of concepts such as portion size and healthy snacking.  After presenting ideas for participants to think about and discuss, participants had the rest of the week to digest the information and find sustainable changes they could fit into their lives on their own.

The program isn’t about seeking beauty or perfection as defined by the media and other external sources, but rather seeking healthy physical, nutritional and emotional changes that will work for each individual person.  The program seems to be achieving just that, with participants noting important healthful changes from the class.  For example one participant stated “I’m trying to listen to my body, eat when I’m hungry and stop when I’m full,” and another participant who calculated she sat for 10 hours a day started walking to and from work, increasing her activity and reducing stress.

 

http://www.msuextension.org/nutrition/Steps.html

Note: This MSU Extension program is not offered on a regular basis and is not currently offered. Please visit the MSU Extension website for more information about what programs are currently offered.

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Eat Right Montana

Eat Right Montana promotes healthy nutrition, physical activity choices, and behavior to improve the well being of all Montanans.

The Eat Right Montana (ERM) Coalition is a diverse group of individuals and organizations who have come together with the common goal of providing consistent, science-based nutrition and physical activity messages to all Montanans.  Since our launch in 1992, we have understood the benefits of collaboration and partnerships.  We work to meet our mission of promoting healthy eating and active lifestyles for all Montanans by providing:

  • Mini grant opportunities that are open to all Montanans
  • Opportunities for action in your community and across Montana
  • Opportunities to donate your time to help build a healthier Montana, through membership or projects.
  • Healthy Hero Awards, a nomination process that encourages individuals and organizations from across the state to highlight their Health Heroes.

Partner Organizations:

  • American Heart Association
  • Montana Association of School Superintendents
  • Montana Beef Council
  • Blue Cross Blue Shield of Montana
  • Montana Chapter of American Academy of Pediatrics
  • Montana Department of Health & Human Services
  • Montana Cancer Control Programs
  • Cardiovascular Health Program (CVH)
  • Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, & Children (WIC)
  • Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP)
  • Montana Dietetic Association
  • Montana Office of Public Instruction – School Nutrition Programs
  • Montana Office of Rural Health and Montana Area Health Education Center
  • Montana State University—Extension Service
  • Food & Nutrition
  • Nutrition Education Programs
  • 4-Health Program
  • Nutrition and Physical Activity Program (NAPA)
  • Montana Office of Public Instruction
  • School Nutrition Programs
  • Montana Team Nutrition Program
  • North Dakota WIC
  • Rocky Mountain Development Council
  • Shape Up Montana—Big Sky Fit Kids
  • Western Dairy Association

For more information, visit http://www.eatrightmontana.org/index.html

You can also learn more about what Eat Right Montana is doing by checking out their Facebook page: ERM Facebook

Choose You ACS logo

The Choose You Movement

Choose You is a movement created by the American Cancer Society that encourages women to put their own health first in the fight against cancer. The movement challenges women to make healthier choices, and supports them in their commitment to eat right, get active, quit smoking and get regular health checks. 

The Choose You Movement shines a light on a hidden issue: that while one in three American women will get cancer in her lifetime, about 50% of cancer deaths could be prevented if more emphasis were placed on early detection and healthier lifestyles including maintaining a healthy weight through diet and exercise and avoiding tobacco.

In the constant struggle between family, work and self, we know how difficult it is to focus on oneself. To help change this, American Cancer Society has developed the Choose You Commitment. Powered by stickK, this online program provides tools and support to enable women to commit to and achieve their personal health and wellness goals. Research shows that 73% of Commitments with financial stakes are successful. The Choose You Commitment provides this support.

By making a Choose You Commitment today, you are making personal health a priority — and helping in the fight against cancer.

Note: The ACS no longer sponsors this movement, it has been blended into their other programs. More information regarding healthier lifestyles and cancer prevention can be found here: http://www.cancer.org/healthy/index

4-Health

 4-Health

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4-Health is parent education program for healthy lifestyle promotion created by Montana State University Extension. The 10 session program focuses on enhancing food and nutrition behaviors, increasing physical activity, promoting positive body image, and parenting and family communication skills related to healthy living.

The 4-Health Program is aimed at promoting healthy lifestyles among Montana youth through a parent education program. The goal of the program is to increase the knowledge and change the behaviors of parents and children in order to promote health and well-being while preventing or reducing the risk of obesity. In order to meet that goal, the educational program focuses on the following objectives:

  • Parents will gain knowledge about how to lead their family to a healthier lifestyle by increasing their knowledge related to active parenting and family communication, food and nutrition, physically active lifestyles, and positive body image.
  • Parents will enhance their skills and roles as positive change agents by working to change their behaviors related to active parenting and family communication, food and nutrition, physically active lifestyles, and positive body image.

The 4-Health Program is an on-going Montana Extension program, consisting of a 10 parent education sessions addressing specific behavior goals for parents to work on with their youth in the home. These behavioral goals include:

  • Food and Nutrition; Choose foods and beverages packed with nutrients, eat meals and snacks regularly, choose food portions appropriate for activity level, increase time when family eats together, practice the principles of normal, healthy eating, and avoid unhealthy weight control practices.
  • Physical Activity; Create an accessible physical environment that promotes an active lifestyle, reduce sedentary time, promote physical activity through family communication, and take advantage of community sites that provide places for physical activity.
  • Positive Body Image; Focus on each individual’s positive traits and capability, encourage size and body acceptance of self and others, understand media and environmental influences on the development of body image, teach and model healthy self-esteem, respect, and confidence.
  • Parenting and Family Communication; Practice good communication skills, provide high levels of love, warmth, and boundaries, advocate for preteens, provide opportunities for preteens to grow and develop an identity.

The ten sessions are outlined in both a Parent Guide for participants, and a Facilitator Guide for instructors, which includes learning objectives, teaching points, PowerPoint slides, videos, and further facilitation information.  Each session includes healthy living information and interactive activities on the topics of enhancing healthy food and nutrition behavior choices, engaging in a physically active lifestyle, promoting positive body image, and practicing active parenting. Goal setting is done at every session and an end of session evaluation tool is provided. In addition to in-session learning, there is a “time for action” section of out-of-session activities for use with preteens and families.  Examples of out-of-session activities include healthy cooking assignments for the preteen and parent to complete together, home environment assessments that look at the family home in terms of how it promotes or inhibits healthy behaviors, a preteen grocery store scavenger hunt and nutrition label reading activity, and options for online activities that engage participants in conversation outside of the session meeting time. Curriculum materials can be viewed and downloaded at the program website, www.4health.org.

For more information about 4-Health, please contact Carrie Benke at 406-994-4351 or carrie.benke@montana.edu